Tagged Bowdoin Museum of Art

Photo Source:   Kan Kawada, Japanese, Tokyo Street, 1976, (detail),  color woodcut.

Gallery Conversation: “Artistic Expression in Modern Japanese Prints”

At this lecture, Bowdoin students from Art History 3180: Japanese Prints, along with Assistant Professor Alison Miller, discuss their experience planning the installation Sosaku-hanga: Twentieth-Century Japanese Creative Prints.

Open to the public free of charge.

Photo Source:   Kan Kawada, Japanese, Tokyo Street, 1976, (detail),  color woodcut.
Photo Source:   Kan Kawada, Japanese, Tokyo Street, 1976, (detail),  color woodcut.

Photo:   Kan Kawada, Japanese, Tokyo Street, 1976, (detail),  color woodcut. Gift of Susan and James Carter. Bowdoin College Museum of Art

Detail of Masaharu Takami, Japanese, Untitled (Schoolchild's Drawing from Hiroshima, Japan), 1953, mixed media. Photo Source

Michael Amano ’17 – Gallery Conversation: “Perspectives from Postwar Hiroshima”

At this lecture, Michael Amano, co-curator of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art exhibition Perspectives from Postwar Hiroshima: Chuzo Tamotzu, Children’s Drawings, and the Art of Resolution, will speak about the aftermath of the Second World War and the particular challenges faced by citizens in Hiroshima.

He will discuss the exchange of children’s drawings between students in Hiroshima and Santa Fe, organized by the Japanese-American artist Chuzo Tomatzu, and his recent interviews with four of the Japanese artists who took part in this project.

Admission is open to the public.

Detail of Masaharu Takami, Japanese, Untitled (Schoolchild's Drawing from Hiroshima, Japan), 1953, mixed media. Photo Source
Detail of Masaharu Takami, Japanese, Untitled (Schoolchild’s Drawing from Hiroshima, Japan), 1953, mixed media. Photo Source
Drawing by Japanese schoolchild in Hiroshima

Perspectives from Postwar Hiroshima: Chuzo Tamotzu, Children’s Drawings, and the Art of Resolution

This exhibition at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art showcases drawings created in the early 1950s by Japanese school children living in Hiroshima. The drawings were created as part of an art exchange with students in Santa Fe, New Mexico, which was organized by the Japanese-American artist Chuzo Tamotzu as a means of fostering reconciliation between Japan and the United States in the wake of World War II. Perspectives from Postwar Hiroshima addresses the thematic choices of the young Japanese artists and reflects upon the project’s long-term significance for the participants and for Tamotzu.

Exhibition dates are January 10 – April 16, 2017. Please check the museum’s website for open hours.

The Bowdoin College Museum of Art is open to the public free of charge, although donations are welcome.

Drawing by Japanese schoolchild in Hiroshima
Photo Source: http://www.bowdoin.edu/art-museum/exhibitions/2017/Drawings-for-Hiroshima.shtml
“Rooftops of Nagoya,” 1963, woodblock by Junichiro Sekino (1914-1988). Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

Japanese Print Show Collaboration

During the past semester, students from Alison J. Miller’s course, “Japanese Print Culture,” had the opportunity to curate an exhibition about postwar “creative prints,” also known as sōsaku-hanga.

Students engaged in close looking sessions in the Zuckert seminar room with works drawn from the Museum’s collection of historic and modern Japanese prints. They were intrigued to observe transformations in print techniques and materials over a time span of three centuries. “The activities surrounding the exhibition,” Miller notes, “from research to design, label writing to gallery talks, provided a great opportunity for students to apply their classroom knowledge and to actively engage with objects in the Museum’s collection.”

The class worked with Ellen Tani, the Museum’s Andrew W. Mellon postdoctoral curatorial fellow, to identify a group of works that were connected to the broader themes of the current exhibition Art & Resolution, 1900 to Today. The selection of sōsaku-hanga was a logical choice; abstract and individually produced, these prints brought a new wave of Japanese art to international acclaim and enhanced cross-cultural relations in the postwar period. This print style gained popularity among both Japanese and American collectors after earning critical acclaim at the Sao Paolo Biennale in 1951.

The creation of sōsaku-hanga at the hands of one artist rather than a workshop of skilled artisans signaled a departure from the way Japanese prints had been made for centuries, but they also paid homage to a legacy of techniques, materials, and subject matter. The prints on view show well-known landmarks, architectural spaces and figures, from centuries-old city gates to contemporary poets, in unconventional ways, frequently through methods of abstraction inspired by these artists’ responses to the complexities of their time.

Sōsaku-hanga: Twentieth Century Japanese Creative Prints is on view at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art from January 10, 2017, through April 16, 2017 as part of Art & Resolution, 1900 to Today.

“Rooftops of Nagoya,” 1963, woodblock by Junichiro Sekino (1914-1988). Bowdoin College Museum of Art.
“Rooftops of Nagoya,” 1963, woodblock by Junichiro Sekino (1914-1988). Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

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